Netanyahu's Arrogant Obstruction Signals Need to Change U.S.-Israeli Relations

Posted Feb. 4, 2015

MP3 Interview with Mel Goodman, former CIA analyst and director of the National Security Project at the Center for International Policy, conducted by Scott Harris

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Republican House Speaker John Boehner upped the ante in his party’s confrontation with the Obama administration over U.S. nuclear talks with Iran when he opted not to consult the White House or State Department about inviting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address a joint session of Congress about Iran on March 3. Netanyahu, who is campaigning for a fourth term in Israeli’s March 17 election, is expected to urge support in Congress for new sanctions against Iran, despite warnings that the measure would derail ongoing negotiations with Tehran over its nuclear program.

Anger at the apparent deliberate breach in protocol was exacerbated by the fact that the announcement of the visit came after several high-level interactions between U.S. and Israeli officials. No mention of the planned trip was made by the Israelis during a phone call between Obama and Netanyahu and a long meeting between Secretary of State John Kerry and Israel’s ambassador to the U.S., Ron Dermer.

Some Democrats who were originally supportive of the Republican initiative to impose new sanctions targeting Iran reversed course after many were upset at Israel’s brazen political maneuvering in Congress. There’s also irritation at Israel’s recent announcement that it will call for bids on the construction of 450 new housing units in the occupied Palestinian West Bank, a violation of international law and United Nations Resolutions 242 and 338. Between The Lines’ Scott Harris spoke with Mel Goodman, a former CIA analyst who currently serves as director of the National Security Project at the Center for International Policy. Here, he discusses his recent article, "Benjamin Netanyahu: the Anti-American Obstructionist," about his view that the U.S. urgently needs to change its relationship with Israel.

For more information on the National Security Project at the Center for International Policy, visit ciponline.org/programs/national-security-project.

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